Book History

Author: Louis A. Godey and Sarah J. Hale
Louis A. Godey, born in New York in 1804, started work for a city newspaper in New York City as a paperboy at the age of fifteen. He was then employed in a broker's office until moving to Philadelphia in 1828 to work at the Daily Chronicle and then publishing Godey’s in 1830. Godey himself never penned anything in his magazine but he did employ many authors to write articles, poems, music, and prose for the magazine. However, unlike the mystery kept in most literary magazines, Godey published the names of his writers and paid them. A few noteworthy authors’ that contributed articles were Washington Irving and Edgar Allen Poe. Godey worked published his Lady’s Book till retiring in 1877, dying in 1878.

The right hand in the creation of Godey's was Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale, who assumed editor control of the publication. Hale initially received praise for her two-volume novel "Northwood" which was published in Boston in 1827. This lead to her position of editor of "Ladies Magazine" under Reverend John Blake in Boston, which merged with Godey's in 1837. She remained editor of Godey's for forty years until retiring in 1877. Hale is well known for her popular poems such as "Mary Had A Little Lamb," the creation of Thanksgiving Day, and the Bunker Hill Monument of Boston, MA. She was an advocate for the literature, fashion, and domestic duties of middle-class women. She spoke openly about women’s advances in education, the moral differences from men, and to a degree, suffrage as well.
Bibliographic Information
Godey’s Lady’s Book ran from 1830-1878. In 1837, Godey’s and the Ladies Magazine of Boston, the oldest periodical of its kind, merged bringing Sarah Hale to Philadelphia to assume the role of editor-in-chief in 1841. With Sarah Hale resigning in 1870, the magazine began its decline. Godey sold the magazine to John Hill Seyes Haulenbeek in 1878 before his death and the magazine ceased with Haulenbeek’s death in 1898. By 1851 Godey’s boasted a record of 70,000 subscribers and a decade later over 150,000.
Physical Description
This particular Godey’s Lady’s Book from 1867 (volume 74 and 75) is 1,124 pages long including engravings and illustrations. Initially Godey's Lady's Magazine came out in monthly installments. The volume been rebound to include all the issues in one individual book. It is split into two sections at the half-year mark: July. January and July have a Table of Contents that has accurate page numbers for articles, illustrations, poems, prose, music and fashions.

A later publisher used Muslin lining in rib grain to tie all the issues together. The cover is a red and yellow marbling on the paper board cover with leather wrapped around the binding and edges sewn onto the cover. The paper composition is of was printed on was made of mechanical wood pulp because it was cheaper and could be used with ease through the role press process. The fashion plates, however, continued to be made of fine linen rags for extra thickness and durability. Dimension's of the book 6 x 6½ inches wide including binding, 6½ x 10 long inches long, and 3 inches tall.
Illustrator: Kimmel & Forster and The Illman Brothers
The types of illustrations included in Godey's were hand-colored plates, mezzotints, engravings, woodcuts, and chromolithographs. Depicted in these designs were fashion plates, patterns for handcrafts, women's customs, and biographical sketches.

The main illustrator of the fashion plates in the 1867 volume publication of Godey's was Kimmel & Forster, N.Y. Co. who specialized in lithographs and hand-painted fashion plates. These colored engravings debuted in the magazine in 1838 and were either hand-colored by anonymous female artists or by colored blocks.The fashion plates of Godey’s influenced others to try their hand at colored engravings as well, specifically Peterson’s Magazine (1842-1898).

The Illman Brothers eere another illustrator firm base in New York that specialized in engravings for Godey's. Two of their engravings are included in January and December of Godey's. As well as the engravings for the "Novelties" and "Work Department" of Godey's of embroidery patterns, sewing patterns, and fashion patterns.
Publisher: Louis A. Godey
The first Lady’s Book was self-published by Louis Godey in 1830 by utilizing previously used steel printing plates as well as articles from British and French papers. My particular volume of Godey's includes every month of the year 1867 and is 1,124 pages long including engravings and illustrations. In 1837, Godey’s and the Ladies Magazine of Boston, the oldest periodical of its kind, merged bringing Sarah Hale to Philadelphia to assume the role of editor-in-chief in 1841.
Manifestations
Godey's Lady's Book is populated in multiple libraries in the United States.Through WorldCat, I found that Godey's is not all that rare, it is present in 1,147 libraries under varying titles. It is also available in microfilm form and in digital archival form through Accessible Archives.

Many of the fashion plates were cut out of Godey's, so it is rare to find a volume with all 12 fashion plates in tact and left in its original publication form such as this one.
Bibliography
Primary

Godey, Louis A. Godey’s Lady’s Book. Edited by Sarah J. Hale. Philadelphia: 1867.

Secondary

Brown, Richard D. Knowledge Is Power: The Diffusion of Information in Early America, 1700-1865. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Eldridge, Charlotte (Blakley). The Godey Lady Doll; the Story of Her Creation with Patterns for Dresses and Doll Furniture. New York: Hastings House, 1953.

Entrikin, Isabelle (Webb). Sarah Josepha Hale and Godey’s Lady’s Book. Philadelphia, 1946.

Gaskell, Philip. A New Introduction to Bibliography. New York ; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1972.

Kelley, Mary, and Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. Learning to Stand & Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America’s Republic. Chapel Hill: Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, 2006.

Oberholtzer, Ellis Paxson. The Literary History of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: George W. Jacobs, 1906.

Okker, Patricia. Our Sister Editors: Sarah J. Hale and the Tradition of Nineteenth-Century American Women Editors. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995.

Pattee, Fred. The First Century of American Literature, 1770-1870. New York: Cooper Square Publishers, 1966.

The proposed image given was taken by Morgan Mangold on November 9, 2011. It is of the Godey's September Fashions Plate circa Volume 75 1867.
Essay
Godey's Lady's Book - 1867

Godey’s Lady’s Book ran from 1830-1878.The first Lady’s Book was published in 1830 by utilizing previously used steel printing plates as well as articles from British and French papers. Godey was strongly influenced to create his magazine by the “gift books” of the era. These were specialty made and specifically marketed towards women near the holidays to be given as presents. In 1837, Godey’s and the Ladies Magazine of Boston, the oldest periodical of its kind, merged bringing Sarah Hale to Philadelphia to assume the role of editor-in-chief in 1841. With Sarah Hale resigning in 1870, the magazine began its decline. Godey sold the magazine to John Hill Seyes Haulenbeek in 1878 before his death and the magazine ceased with Haulenbeek’s death in 1898.

At fifteen, Godey started to work for a city newspaper in New York City as a paperboy, was then employed in a broker's office until moving to Philadelphia in 1828 where was a “scissor's editor” for Charles Alexander on the Daily Chronicle before publishing Godey’s. Louis A. Godey had his own section in Godey’s Lady’s Book called “Godey’s Arm-Chair”. In it he advertises and recommends other publications, but spends most of it describing with special care the detail of the steel plates used for that particular month’s fashion plates, engravings, and those to come with the next month. Godey made this the most important part of his commentary because these brilliantly detailed illustrations that made Godey’s unique from other ladies magazines and kept the subscription rates high.

Sarah J. Hale is the author the novel Northwood: Life North and South. Similar to “Godey’s Arm-Chair” Sarah Hale had her “Editor’s Table” in Godey’s. Here she entertained letters to the editor, where women openly spoke about Godey’s as “intensely interesting to the eager eyes and outstretched hands of the young people.” (1) More importantly is that Hale placed her own articles in this segment. She spoke openly about women’s advances in education, the moral differences from men, and to a degree, suffrage. Hale placed a stronger emphasis on the more intellectual, moral content of original American literature, women’s education, and proper womanly behavior than what had been published in Godey’s previously.

This particular volume of Godey’s Lady’s Book from 1867 volume is 1,124 pages long including engravings and illustrations. There are a wide variety of illustrations displayed in Godey’s including hand-colored plates, engravings, woodcuts, and chromolithographs. Godey’s was fragmented to include music, poetry, prose, recipes, articles, handcrafts, and the general, though selective, news of the day. However, fashion plates were by far the most popular feature of Godey’s. These plates depicted the popular fashion trends from Philadelphia, New York, and Paris. The main illustrator of the fashion plates in the 1867 volume publication of Godey's was Kimmel & Forster, N.Y. Co. These colored engravings debuted in the magazine in 1838 and were either hand-colored by anonymous female artists or by colored blocks on fine linen rags for extra thickness and durability. The fashion plates of Godey’s influenced others to try their hand at colored engravings as well, specifically Peterson’s Magazine (1842-1898).This is what women came to Godey’s for and then stayed for the literature among its other pages.

While Godey provided the vehicle, Hale decided on the specialized literature that would be directed solely to women. This collaboration created a relationship with the female public creating a trusting, dedicated, readership. By 1851 Godey’s boasted a record of 70,000 subscribers and a decade later over 150,000. At $3 a year for a subscription, which would be about $50 today, Godey’s was not a cheap commodity making its readership highly dedicated. This particular volume of Godey’s Lady’s Book is rare and of importance because of what it holds among its finely preserved pages. Many of the fashion plates were cut out of the monthlies for their artistic value, so it is rare to find a volume of Godey’s with all 12 fashion plates intact and still left in its original publication form.

1. Louis Godey, Godey’s Lady’s Book, 94.

Submitted by Morgan Mangold
Published: 1867
Call Number: Rare AP 2. G56 V.74-75
css.php